The end of another year…

In June I began this blog with a post on the writing process. I was always a bit apprehensive about starting a blog. What have I got of worth to give to the world? I managed to shake that niggling thought.

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“Tell me, and I’ll forget.” A quick guide to show v tell

In his book, On Writing, Sol Stein provides a very helpful guide on something writers so often hear about: showing the story instead of telling it. Do you remember asking someone, a family member perhaps, to tell you a story? It's almost as if we've been conditioned to tell rather than show.

We did it!

Yesterday, after months of promising, I finally got to treat the residents of Ranelagh House to a rare day out to the cinema to watch 'White Christmas'.

The Website: A Writer’s Shop Window

If you're serious about your writing, a website is like your shop window, sitting amidst a sea of millions upon millions of others. All those readers whizzing by whose attention you're desperate to catch are unlikely to a cast a glance your way if you haven't got one.

Writing Orwellian prose

For my 50th post I thought I’d take a look back at the past 5 or so months at what I’ve thrown out into the world for your enjoyment. I was going to share the most popular post to date, but instead I’ve decided to share my personal favourite—the one that’s helped me the most in researching and writing it. So here it is, my guide to writing Orwellian prose.

Thank you to everyone who’s so far subscribed to this blog. It means a hell of a lot. In the months to come I’ll be looking to giveaway more free content and of course keep the articles coming. Here’s to the next 50!

Richie Billing

For more writing tips and discussions on the fantasy genre, why not sign up to my mailing list? When you do, you’ll receive a free eBook on the craft of creative writing, featuring guides to world-building, writing fight scenes, plotting, viewpoint, editing, prose, and much, much more.


Two styles of prose tend to dominate: clear, concise prose, referred to as ‘Orwellian’, or the ‘clear pane of glass’, and; florid, literary prose, referred to as the ‘stained glass window’. First we’ll have a look at each, before going on to discuss how you can achieve them.

Orwellian prose

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George Orwell in his essay, Politics and the English Language, set out what he thinks good prose ought to consist of, all the while attacking the political system for the destruction of good writing practices. He was very much against the over-complication of language, which at the time (1946), was the direction…

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Real Writing Stories #5 – My Writing Day – Lucy Summers

Today I'm delighted to introduce fantasy writer Lucy Summers. I met Lucy in an online writing community a few months ago. She's always the one sharing helpful and encouraging things. Lucy's just finished her first novel and is about to embark upon the quest of getting it published. Enough of me, here's Lucy:

The many sub-genres of Fantasy

In identifying your sub-genre you can better target your readers as well as the types of publishers that look for that type of tale. Not only that, it’ll help to make useful comparisons to other, well-known books in that sub-genre which may, with luck, help you sell more!

Real Writing Stories #4 – My Writing Day – Marya Miller

I'm delighted to share the writing day of Marya Miller, a wonderful person who I met through social media. Marya is an excellent storyteller with some fantastic ideas. Not long ago I read her collection of short fiction, Tales of Mist and Magic, and fell in love with the characters, Granny Maberly in particular.

The NaNoWriMo Review

NaNoWriMo has come to an end for another year. This was my first time, and after speaking about taking part before the event I thought I ought to share my experience.